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VA Aid & Attendance

VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefits for Wartime Veterans & Spouses


Some Mid-South WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Wartime Veterans & Spouses can qualify for $13,500 to $25,000 or more annually – tax free!

The VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension provides financial assistance to qualified veterans and their surviving spouses. This is a benefit that Wartime Veterans have earned due to their service to our country, but few have ever heard about it. 

What is the Aid & Attendance Pension?
The Aid and Attendance (A&A) Pension provides benefits that reduce the cost of senior care for veterans and surviving spouses who require assisted living.
Am I eligible for the Aid & Attendance pension?
Any wartime veteran with 90 days of active duty, 1 day beginning or ending during a period of war, is eligible to apply for the Aid & Attendance Improved Pension. A surviving spouse (marriage must have ended due to death of veteran) of a wartime veteran may also apply. The individual applying must qualify both medically and financially. This free, one-minute questionnaire can better help determine if you may be eligible for the Aid and Attendance benefit.
What is the difference between wartime and peacetime service?

Military service is classified either as wartime or peacetime service. This distinction is important because there are significant advantages specifically accruing only to veterans with wartime service. For example, only veterans with wartime service are eligible for non-service-connected pension benefits like Aid and Attendance.

The following list sets out the periods of wartime designated by Congress for pension purposes. To be considered by the VA to have served during wartime, a veteran need not have served in a combat zone, but simply during one of these designated periods. All other times are considered peacetime.

Some veterans served part of their tour of duty during wartime and part during peacetime. Even if a majority of a veteran’s service occurred during peacetime, the service member would still meet the wartime service requirement for eligibility for pension benefits if he or she served ninety consecutive days, at least one day of which occurred during a period designated as wartime. All of the listed dates are inclusive.

  • Indian Wars: January 1, 1817, through December 31, 1898. The veteran must have served thirty days or more, or for the duration of such Indian War. Service must have been with the U.S. forces against Indian tribes or nations.

  • Spanish-American War: April 21, 1898, through July 4, 1902, including the Philippine Insurrection and the Boxer Rebellion. Also included are those individuals engaged in the Moro Province hostilities through July 15, 1903.

  • Mexican Border War: May 9, 1916, through April 5, 1917. The veteran must have served for one day or more in Mexico, on the borders thereof, or in the waters adjacent thereto.

  • World War I: April 6, 1917, through November 11, 1918, extended to April 1, 1920, for those who served in the Soviet Union. Service after November 11, 1918, through July 2, 1921, qualifies for benefits purposes if active duty was performed for any period during the basic World War I period.

  • World War II: December 7, 1941, through December 31, 1946, extended to July 25, 1947, where continuous with active duty on or before December 31, 1946

  • Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through January 31, 1955.

  • Vietnam Era: August 5, 1964, through May 7, 1975.90 However, February 28, 1961, through May 7, 1975, for a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period.

  • Persian Gulf War: August 2, 1990, through a date to be prescribed by Presidential proclamation or law.

Congress has not enacted legislation that would make the periods covering the 1983-1984 Lebanon crisis or the invasions of Grenada and Panama wartime service.

 

How do I apply for Aid & Attendance?

There are three main steps in the application process: gathering the necessary documents, filling out the correct application form to submit to the VA with the necessary documents, and mailing all of the documents to the correct pension processing center. Head on over to our How to Apply page to find out more.

Is there any way to start the application process while I gather all the documents?

You can submit a one-page VA Form 21-0966 (INTENT TO FILE A CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION AND/OR PENSION, OR SURVIVORS PENSION AND/OR DIC) which will get the claim into the system.

How long does it take to process the application and get approved?

This is a difficult question to answer. Much depends on the VA regional office for your area. On average, 6 to 8 months seems to be the normal approval time at the moment. Some approvals come through in as little as 6 weeks, but these are the exception. We know of people still waiting for an approval 12 months from the date of filing.

Keep in mind that if the benefit is approved, it is applied retroactively to the date of application. Also, if the applicant is over 90 years old, include a letter requesting that the application be expedited. The VA is supposed to give priority to any application for benefits by a veteran age 90 or older.

What are the Aid and Attendance pension benefit amounts for 2017?

Is there a “look back” period when submitting the application?

Currently, there is no “look back” period, as with other government programs, such as Medicaid. The VA looks at the value of assets on hand at the time of Aid & Attendance application.

Can I apply for the Aid & Attendance pension if I am already receiving compensation from the VA?

If you are currently receiving disability compensation from the VA, you cannot receive both the compensation and pension. What you can do is file for the Improved Pension based on non-service connected health issues. If the application is approved, the VA will pay whichever benefit has the highest dollar amount. If you are receiving compensation for a service-connected injury, that compensation would not be counted as income. However, you should include VA Form 21-4138 Statement in Support of Claim that specifies that you receive compensation, but you want the VA to pick which benefit will pay the most.

If you are receiving compensation you need to make certain that you are receiving the maximum possible dollar amount for your condition BEFORE filing for the Improved Pension.

Note: health issues can be a secondary condition related to your service-connected disability. You should speak with a qualified Veterans Service Officer before filing for Improved Pension.

If you are service-connected, you might also be eligible for Special Monthly Compensation (SMC). SMC is a rate paid in addition to or in place of 0% to 100% combined degree compensation.

To qualify for SMC, a veteran must be disabled beyond a combined degree percentage or due to special circumstances. You would need to speak with a Veteran’s Service Officer to assist you in determining if you are eligible.

What documents do I need to include in the application?
  • Discharge/separation Papers (DD-214. If you need to request military records, please visitwww.vetrecs.archives.gov to get a copy.

  • Copy of Marriage Certificate (for surviving spouse or when filing for both the veteran and spouse).

  • Copy of current Social Security award letter (Letter that SS sends at the beginning of the year stating what your monthly amount will be for the following year).

  • Net worth information, including bank accounts, CD’s, trust, stocks, bonds, annuities, etc.

  • Proof of all income from pensions, retirement, interest income from investments, annuities, etc.

  • Proof of insurance premiums, medications, medical bills or any other medical expenses that are not reimbursed by insurance or Medicare.

  • Physician statement that includes current diagnosis, medical status, prognosis, name and address, ability to care for self, ability to travel unattended, etc. If the applicant is in a nursing home or assisted living facility, you will need to submit a Nursing Home Status Form and a Statement of Occupancy from the facility (ask the facility for this Statement).

  • Banking information for direct deposit of monthly payments (include a voided check).

  • List of all doctors and hospitals visited in the last year.

Be sure to include VA form 21-0845 (Authorization to Disclose Personal Information to a Third Party) if you are filing for your loved one and need to oversee the application process. Without this authorization, the VA will not discuss the application with you.

Never send originals and ALWAYS send all correspondence via Certified Mail “Registered Return Receipt” as well as keeping a complete copy of everything for your own records. If you are in the process of completing an A&A claim, the VA states, “It is not necessary to request a duplicate copy of a veteran’s discharge or separation papers solely for the purpose of filing a claim for VA Benefits. If complete information about the veteran’s service is furnished on the application, the VA will obtain verification of service.” In spite of what the VA says, we recommend including a copy to avoid any imposed delay.

Here are complete instructions on How to Apply for the Aid and Attendance Benefit.

Are there other Veterans Improved Pensions that are available besides Aid & Attendance?

Yes, below are descriptions of two other tiers of the VA Improved Pension:

Basic Pension

The VA classifies any veteran at the age of 65 to be permanently and totally disabled regardless of your physical state. The classification of “disabled” entitles the veteran or widow for a Basic Pension if he/she meets the net worth and income criteria. The same is true for the surviving spouse. No Physician’s Statement is required for filing for Basic Pension.

To be eligible for Basic Pension:

  •  A veteran alone must have countable income LESS than $12,907 a year*

    A veteran with a dependent or spouse must have countable income LESS than: $16,902 a year*

Here is a worksheet to learn how to calculate “countable income”.

Housebound Pension

For those who wish to remain in either their own home or the home of a family member, you can apply for the Housebound level of the Improved Pension. A Physician’s Statement is also required for the Housebound level. The VA will automatically consider this level if the claimant does not fully qualify for Aid and Attendance.

The criteria for Housebound requires that the claimant needs regular assistance, but is not as limited as those who would qualify for Aid and Attendance.

Care can be provided by family members or outside caregiver’s agencies. Families need to be reimbursed for the care and services they are providing just as you would an outside agency. It is recommended that you survey the costs of these services in your area to determine what a fair amount to charge would be.

It is imperative that an accurate accounting of expenses is kept. Do not ever pay in cash as you must have a record of payments via check, money order, etc. The VA does not currently send out an annual evaluation form known as an EVR to determine if the applicant still meets the standards of criteria, but this could be reinstated in the future. Without proof of expenses, the VA will stop payments on the pension. An EVR could be required an all three levels of the Improved Pension.

The same forms are used for filing for Aid and Attendance and Housebound:

To be eligible for Housebound Benefit:

  • A veteran alone must have countable income LESS than $15,773 a year*

  • A veteran with a spouse must have countable income LESS than: $19,770 a year*

Here is a worksheet to learn how to calculate “countable income”.

How can I find my VA file number?

If a veteran has never had a claim with the VA before they may not have a VA file number. In this case, for the Aid and Attendance application, you would leave that field blank on the forms.

Is the Aid and Attendance pension benefit taxable?

No, the Aid and Attendance pension is not a taxable benefit.

Does the VA recognize Power of Attorney?

Unfortunately the VA does not recognize Power of Attorney (POA) or Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA). If your loved is capable of managing their own affairs, and you hold POA of DPOA for emergency purposes, it will be easier for them to sign and handle the appropriate correspondence.

If your loved one is not capable of managing their own affairs due to diminished mental capacity as in dementia or Alzheimer’s, the VA is going to rule that they are in need of a fiduciary. Holding POA or DPOA does not grant this authority to you. Once you receive notification from the VA that they find it necessary for a fiduciary to be appointed you should submit Form 21-4138 and include the following statement:

Please be advised that (parent’s name) and I have no issue with the VA finding of incompetence and wish to proceed with the appointment of a fiduciary. We wish to appoint myself (her/his insert your relationship to the veteran) as fiduciary. I understand that I must be interviewed prior to that appointment and would appreciate such an interview be scheduled as soon as possible.

At this point both you (or whoever is asking to be appointed) and the applicant will have to be interviewed by a VA Field Agent who will determine if you are an appropriate person to assign fiduciary to.

Note: Due to the overwhelming needs for interviews such as this, it can take months before you are contacted to schedule an appointment. You may need to be proactive in calling and “requesting” that an appointment be scheduled. You should allow at least 30 days before following up with contact.

If your situation is one that the delay in payments will create an extreme financial hardship, you can include the following statement as a way of expediting payment:

I respectfully question the withholding of my (parent’s name) benefits, pending the appointment of a fiduciary. Referencing a VA policy: Pursuant to VA Manual M21-1, Section 17.15: Procedure Upon Receipt of Evidence of Incompetency, your manual states “Do not routinely suspend direct payments to a beneficiary pending development of an issue of incompetency or certification of a fiduciary.” The manual further states: “If entitlement to benefits has been established but no payment has been made or if increased benefits are payable, make a determination as to whether or not benefits should be paid directly pending certification. The determination should consider if delaying the payment of the benefits would cause undue hardship for the beneficiary. If the evidence of record shows that delaying payment would create a hardship, properly annotate the award, referencing the evidence reviewed and the justification for paying benefits directly to the beneficiary.” I think if you reference (parent’s name) claim, you will see that withholding his/her payment does constitute a hardship for him/her. I would like to request that he/she receive payments during the fiduciary appointment process.

What portion of assisted living expenses can be counted as deductible expenses?
If the VA rules that the applicant is entitled to Aid & Attendance or Housebound benefits, then ALL costs are deductible. The VA’s Operating Manual states: “Allow all reasonable fees paid to the facility as long as the facility provides some medical or nursing services for the disabled person. These services do not have to be furnished by a licensed health professional.”
If my parents sell their home before moving into assisted living, do they need to count that money as income?

It does not count as “income”, BUT the moment that money is deposited into the bank, it will automatically become part of their net worth. If plans are to sell the home, it would be best to handle this matter before making application for A&A. It may be advisable to speak with a financial advisor so that they can determine the best way to disperse the money from the sale. Any money that is retained in savings accounts, put into CD’s, IRA’s etc, will become part of their net worth.

Remember that there is no “look back” period for Aid & Attendance. Assets are counted from the date of application. The VA’s income-based programs are intended to give beneficiaries a minimum level of financial security. They are not intended to protect substantial assets or build up the beneficiary’s estate for the benefit of their heirs. The purpose of this program is to help those in financial need.

My parents divorced. Would my mother still be eligible for this pension based on my other father’s service?

Generally the answer to this question is no. However, if the divorce was due to physical abuse or extreme mental cruelty, the VA has been known to consider these circumstances and consider the application.

There would have to be documentation and unquestionable evidence supporting the claim of abuse in order for this to be applicable. Even if this is the case, the VA is not required to consider the application.

My mother needs to be moved to an assisted living facility, but my father is still capable of living at home. Can we file for her based on my father’s service?

The veteran has to qualify in order for the spouse to be eligible, so no, you cannot file based on her need. However, a vet with an ill spouse can file for “Basic” Pension if all of her medical costs wipe out their monthly income. The application process is the same as if the veteran were filing for Aid & Attendance.

My father died and my mother remarried a non-veteran who has died. Is she eligible to apply based on my father’s service?

Unless she was already receiving death benefits after your father died, she would not be eligible to make an application based on his service.

My loved one died before payments were made on an approved application; is anyone entitled to the accrued funds?

If your loved one passes during the application process prior to funds being released, you are entitled to file against those accrued benefits for expenses associated with the “last illness.” This is not limited to just the out of pocket expenses incurred for final arrangements not covered by pre-existing arrangements or policies, nor is it for the last ambulance ride.

EXAMPLE:

You made application on March 15, 2008 for Aid & Attendance. The application was approved, but the VA delayed payments due to incompetency issues such as dementia pending a fiduciary being approved or appointed.

Your loved one passes on August 25, 2008 leaving 5 months of accrued benefits that were never paid out.

Most would assume, based on the form letter you will receive from the VA informing you that the file has been closed since the applicant is now deceased, that there is no other recourse, when actually there is.

Here is Form 21-601- Application for Accrued Amounts due a Deceased Beneficiary

We suggest that in addition to closely following the directions for completing Form 21-601 that you include a copy of your birth certificate indicating you are a legal heir. You will also need to list all siblings who may also be entitled to file. In the case of a sibling or other legal heir who has been excluded from entitlement, you need to include a copy of the Last Will & Testament validating that fact.

Key Points to Remember:

    • You only have 1 year to file for reimbursement.

    • You should anticipate 6-12 months for the claim to be processed and check(s) issued.

    • An application has to already be on file with the VA that has been approved.

How do I determine “countable income”?

The formula for “countable income” is not very difficult. However, you should be able to document how you arrived at your figures. This worksheet is not required to be submitted with the full application.

Can you receive both Medicaid and the veterans Aid and Attendance benefit?

A veteran and/or spouse of a veteran can receive both Medicaid and the veterans pension benefit; however, the maximum Aid and Attendance benefit amount they will be able to receive is $90 a month. This $90 must be spent on personal care items.

Federal Handbooks

We have attempted to distill the information down to what’s most important to make it easier for you but if you prefer to do more research on your own, please ready one of these most updated handbooks on Federal Benefits for Veterans, Dependents, and Surviving Spouses.

2016 Federal Benefits for Veterans, Dependents, and Surviving Spouses (English)

The program was established to provide financial assistance to veterans and their spouses, allowing them to live out their lives in dignity and afford basic necessities.  The benefit is not dependent upon service related injuries.  It helps cover the cost of qualified, un-reimbursed medical expenses, including in-home care by an outside provider as well as by a family member or at an assisted living facility.

CURRENT WEB SITE COPY

Though it has been in existence since 1979, most veterans and their families have never even heard about it, or, if they have heard about it, they have not been given the guidance on how they can qualify.

THE BASIC CRITERIA FOR QUALIFYING:

1. The Veteran must have served at least 1 day during a qualified war period.     (Service did not have to be in an active combat zone.)

2. The Veteran must have served at least 90 days of active duty.

3. The Veteran must have received a better than dishonorable discharge.

4. The Claimant must be over the age of 65 or permanently or totally disabled

5. The Claimant as a surviving spouse of a qualified Veteran must not have divorced the veteran or     re-married after the veteran’s death.

6. The Claimant or spouse needs assistance with daily living requirements (as certified by an MD)

7. The Claimant’s monthly medical expenses must equal or exceed their monthly income.

The VA Aid and Attendance Improved Pension is one of the most under utilized benefits available to US Military War Period Veterans today. That’s why the Bradley Law Firm PLLC is conducting a series of VA Aid & Attendance improved Pension seminars and workshops at a growing number of locations throughout our service area. 

We will present a seminar or workshop for any VFW or American Legion Post, Assisted Living Facility, Religious Senior Ministry, Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club, bank or other financial institution, company, or association of any kind. We are also conducting seminars in our offices, and we are producing videos for the Internet and DVD’s. 

Please contact our office for seminar and workshop schedules to discuss any of these opportunities or to make an appointment with J. Anthony Bradley to discuss the details privately.

One of only a few VA Accredited Attorneys in the Mid-South, J. Anthony Bradley, is able to help qualified war period veterans and their spouses acquire this valuable benefit.  Group seminars and private sessions on the subject make the qualification process easy to understand for both veterans and their caregivers. 

As a VA Accredited Attorney, J. Anthony Bradley takes a comprehensive approach that ensures the Claimant is protected – not just their money.  He is trained in managing the complexities associated with the veteran’s VA Aid and Attendance Pension qualification process while protecting them from financial hardships in other areas.

Many of us know veterans – directly as family members or indirectly – who might qualify for this benefit they EARNED through service to their Country – and all of us! What a shame it would be for them to miss out on this valuable pension improvement.

Please Contact us today for more information at 901-682-2030 or Toll Free 1-877-439-2532.

Who qualifies for the Disability Benefit?

The VA refers to the disability benefit as “compensation”.   Disability compensation is for those veterans with a service related disability or illness.  There are no limitations on the amount of income or assets you are allowed to keep.

What is Aid and Attendance?

There is another type of monthly benefit available which is referred to as a “pension”.  The pension is generally not related to a service connected injury or illness.

Aid and Attendance is the most common type of pension benefit offered through the VA.  A pension benefit may be able on a monthly basis to help pay for the care of the veteran.  It is typically helpful for those in need of assistance with dressing, toileting, ambulating.

However, there are strict income and asset limitations that apply to Veteran and his or her spouse.  Monthly household income can be off-set by unreimbursed medical expenses.

Home Care Benefits can be approved as aid and attendance even when provided by a family member and can also be provided to spouse of veteran.

This benefit is also income tax free and can help offset the cost of home care, and can even make assisted living more affordable.

Click here for additional information on Aid and Attendance.

Which Veteran’s may qualify?

Pension benefits available to veterans of:

  • World War I – April 6, 1917 – April 1, 1920*

  • World War II – December 7, 1941 – December 31, 1946

  • Korean War – June 27, 1950 – Jan. 31, 1955

  • Vietnam War – February 28, 1961 – May 7, 1975*

  • Persian Gulf War – August 2, 1990 – to be determined

*Subject to certain qualification requirements.  

You did not have to be in a war zone. The time of your service is what counts and must have been other than dishonorably discharged.

Are there Benefits available for Surviving Spouse of Veteran?

Yes. The surviving spouse must be over 65 or totally disabled and must meet the financial requirements for the pension benefit.

Planning for Pension Eligibility

Pension benefits have asset and income limits. Planning for eligibility is essential. There are planning strategies that will help qualify a veteran (or surviving spouse) for benefits.  This planning must be accomplished prior to applying for a pension benefit.

Veterans Benefits are perhaps the most misunderstood and underutilized resources available to millions of veterans and their families.  While it is commonly known that certain benefits are available for the brave men and women who served in our armed forces, many veterans (and their families) are unaware that they could be eligible for a wide range of benefits through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs even if they did not directly retire from the military or suffer injuries in the line of duty.

The VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension provides financial assistance to qualified veterans and their surviving spouses. This is a benefit that veterans have earned due to their service to our country, but few have ever heard about it.  The program was established to provide financial assistance to veterans and their spouses, allowing them to live out their lives in dignity and afford basic necessities.  The benefit is not dependent upon service related injuries.  It helps cover the cost of qualified, un-reimbursed medical expenses, including in-home care by an outside provider as well as by a family member or at an assisted living facility.  Though it has been in existence for decades, most veterans and their families have never even heard about it, or, if they have heard about it, they have not been given the guidance on how they can qualify.

The Basic Criteria for Qualifying:

  • The Veteran must have served at least 1 day during a qualified war period (Service did not have to be in an active combat zone.)

  • The Veteran must have served at least 90 days of active duty.

  • The Veteran must have received a better than dishonorable discharge.

  • The Claimant must be over the age of 65 or permanently or totally disabled

  • The Claimant as a surviving spouse of a qualified Veteran must not have divorced the veteran or re-married after the veteran’s death.

  • The Claimant or spouse needs assistance with daily living requirements (as certified by an MD)

  • The Claimant’s monthly medical expenses must equal or exceed their monthly income.

Veterans Benefits Offered to Eligible Beneficiaries Include:

  • Burial and Memorial:  In exchange for the service that Veterans have selflessly given to the United States, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense provide several memorial and burial services for eligible active-duty, Reserve, Guard, retired and veteran members.  All Veterans and military family members should be aware of the memorial benefits offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs before they are actually needed.

  • Death Pension: The VA Death Pension is a benefit paid to eligible dependents of deceased wartime veterans.

  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation: This is a monthly benefit paid to eligible survivors of certain deceased veterans.

  • Disability Compensation:  Certain military veterans with a service-related disability may qualify for regular monthly benefits. These benefits are generally tax-free and are paid to veterans who have injuries or diseases that occurred while on active duty, or were aggravated and made worse by active military service. It is also paid to certain veterans disabled as a result of care provided by VA medical facilities.

  • Employment & Training: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Department of Labor (DoL) and the Department of Education (DoE) all administer a number of employment, education, and training programs for veterans.  These programs include, but are not limited to The Montgomery G.I. Bill – Active Duty, The Montgomery G.I. Bill – Selected Reserve, Veterans’ Educational Assistance Program (VEAP), Veterans Upward Bound and Veterans’ Employment and Training.

  • Parents DIC:  Parents’ Dependency and Indemnity Compensation is an income-based monthly benefit for the parents of a military service member or veteran who has died.

  • Special Monthly Compensation:  Special Monthly Compensation (SMC) is a monetary compensation (in addition to the regular VA Disability Compensation) to a veteran who, as a result of military service, incurred the loss of or the loss of use of specific organs or extremities. Loss, or loss of use, is described as either an amputation or having no effective remaining function of an extremity or organ. 

  • Survivor Benefits:  Surviving family members of veterans are entitled to certain benefits that can help ease their financial difficulties.  When a loved one dies, it can be emotionally difficult to look into available benefits, but this process should be done as soon as possible to prevent eligibility problems.

  • Veterans Health Care:  The Veterans’ Health Care Eligibility Reform Act was passed by Congress in October of 1996, paving the way for the Medical Benefits Package plan to be made available to all enrolled veterans. The Medical Benefits Package emphasizes preventive and primary care and offers a full range of inpatient and outpatient services. In addition, combat veterans returning from active military service may be eligible to receive free health care services and nursing home care for up to two years, beginning on the date of separation from active military service. This benefit covers all illnesses and injuries except those clearly unrelated to military service.  Dental services are not included in this health care package.

  • Veterans Life Insurance:  Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance (SGLI) is a program which provides low cost group life insurance for service members on active duty, ready reservists, members of the National Guard, members of the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Public Health Service, cadets and midshipmen of the four service academies and members of the Reserve Officer Training Corps.

Unfortunately, many of the eligible beneficiaries are initially denied these benefits when a claim is filed.  Applicants should be aware that the decisions for these claims can be appealed by veterans and their eligible family members.  The process for appeals generally begins with the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA) in Washington, D.C.  Once a claim has been filed and consequently denied, the veteran or other potentially eligible beneficiary has sixty days to file for an appeal with their regional office. 

Legislation was passed and came into effect on June 20, 2007 which provides veterans the option of retaining an attorney after the first denial by the Department of Veterans Affairs at the “Notice of Disagreement” (NOD) stage.

The Department of Veterans Affairs benefits claims and appeals process can be complicated.  If a veteran or a veteran’s family members have received a denial of benefits to which they believe they are entitled, it is in their best interest to contact an attorney who is familiar with veterans benefits to assist them with the application and appeals process.

The VA Aid and Attendance Improved Pension is one of the most under utilized benefits available to US Military War Period Veterans today. That’s why the Bradley Law Firm PLLC is conducting a series of VA Aid & Attendance improved Pension seminars and workshops at a growing number of locations throughout our service area.  We will present a seminar or workshop for any VFW or American Legion Post, Assisted Living Facility, Religious Senior Ministry, Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club, bank or other financial institution, company, or association of any kind. We are also conducting seminars in our offices, and we are producing videos for the Internet and DVD’s.  Please contact our office for seminar and workshop schedules to discuss any of these opportunities or to make an appointment with J. Anthony Bradley to discuss the details privately.

One of only a few VA Accredited Attorneys in the Mid-South, J. Anthony Bradley, is able to help qualified war period veterans and their spouses acquire this valuable benefit.  Group seminars and private sessions on the subject make the qualification process easy to understand for both veterans and their caregivers.  As a VA Accredited Attorney, J. Anthony Bradley takes a comprehensive approach that ensures the Claimant is protected – not just their money.  He is trained in managing the complexities associated with the veteran’s VA Aid and Attendance Pension qualification process while protecting them from financial hardships in other areas.

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The Bradley Law Firm

3107 E. Corporate Edge Drive

Germantown, TN 38138

Phone | 901.682.2030

Fax | 901.624.2684

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